EASyR Lesson

When redesigning content, it was important to me to make my lessons and activities engaging and relevant to learners. Using the EASyR method of lesson design (Evaluate, Analyze, Synthesize, Review and Revise) I was able to make improvements to a lesson that was previously less than engaging. What was originally a lesson that had students easily passing a true/false test has now become a unit where students carefully evaluate the different aspects of plagiarism, analyze plagiarism as a phenomenon, and synthesize that information by creating scenarios that could be considered plagiarism. They then analyze the situations their peers present, and apply the new knowledge to determine if plagiarism has occurred. 

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Academic Integrity/Intellectual Property: Plagiarism
Original Lesson: Previously, students would watch a presentation I created on what plagiarism is. Then, I would present them with true/false questions as a whole class to determine if they understood all of the forms of plagiarism, sort of like a “game”. When I adapted it to an online course originally, the presentation became a video that they watched, with a written transcript, and the true/false questions became a quiz. When I adapted the unit to a mobile learning unit to be used by the entire student body, the quiz changed from true/false to have students looking at scenarios and determining if the student in question was plagiarizing or not. Optional extension activities were suggested to teachers who wished to expand the lesson beyond just the quizzes and video.


Changes to lesson are indicated by red text.


Old Mobile Lesson

New EASyR Lesson

Changes/Rationale/Application of EASyR

Target Population –

Grade Level: 9-12

Population Characteristics: Students are a mix of honors, general and special education. These lessons will be used with all grade levels and all classes.

Lesson Groupings: Individual – Can be done with students in the classroom, assigned as homework, or as as a station.

Target Population –

Grade Level: 9-12

Population Characteristics: Students are a mix of honors, general and special education in an online course setting.

Lesson Groupings: Individual and small group

Previously, the mobile lesson was designed to be completed individually by students. Based on social constructivist theories, I really wanted to move it back to the small group arena for deeper understanding.

Curriculum Links –

CC.ELA.W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.


Curriculum Links –

Additional standards met are listed at the end of this document to avoid an excessively large table.

With the addition of the optional activities, many more CCSS are met. Although this is more of a Unit than a lesson, I feel it is important for students to have a wide exposure to the idea of plagiarism to allow them to evaluate what is important before participating in creating scenarios later on.

Objectives –

Students will be able to

  • Define plagiarism

  • Identify whether actions in scenarios would be considered acceptable or unacceptable

  • Identify steps to take to avoid plagiarism


Objectives –

Students will be able to

  • Define plagiarism

  • Synthesize information to create scenarios that could be plagiarism

  • Analyze actions in scenarios to determine if they are considered acceptable or unacceptable

  • Identify steps to take to avoid plagiarism

Students are now interacting with much more information on plagiarism, and being asked to synthesize it to create a scenario that their classmates must then analyze. Students will also be evaluating the information presented, and identifying steps they should take to avoid plagiarism.

Materials and Timing –

Computer or Mobile Device with Internet Access

Materials and Timing –

Computer or Mobile Device with Internet Access

Access to course management system

Now housed in an LMS rather than the library website

Scope and Sequence –

Teacher introduction –Today we are going to talk about Academic Integrity and Plagiarism.

Students will be asked to take out a computer or mobile device with Internet Access

Students will be asked to fill out the Academic Pre-Unit Integrity Survey

Students will be asked to complete the Academic Integrity: Plagiarism Pre-Test

Students will be asked to view the Plagiarism Video Lecture (also available on library web page)

Students will be asked to complete the Academic Integrity: Plagiarism Post-Test

Students will be asked to complete the “how useful was this lesson” survey


Scope and Sequence –

Students will be asked to fill out the Academic Pre-Unit Integrity Survey

Students will be asked to complete the Academic Integrity: Plagiarism Pre-Test

Students will be asked to view the Plagiarism Video Lecture (also available on library web page)

Read NYTimes articles

Participate in the Plagiarism in the “real world” Discussion Forum

Read “The Plagiarist”

Participate in “The Plagiarist” Discussion

Respond to “The Plagiarist” Essay Prompt

Read “What is Copyright” Guidelines

Read “What is Fair Use” Guidelines

Read “What is Creative Commons” Guidelines


Participate in the Scenarios Discussion:

1. Based on what you have learned about plagiarism, and the various things that are considered plagiarism, please create a scenario involving a person and intellectual property. (You decide if the person is plagiarising or not, but keep it a secret from us!). This can be a student, a public figure, or just a regular person.

Example: Brittany needs to write about symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird for English class. She has no idea where to start, so she goes to sparknotes for ideas. While she is there, she writes down their examples of where the symbols occur as well. She does not include a bibliography with her essay.


2. Post your scenario to the discussion board.


3. When you have posted your scenario, please return to the discussion board and respond to 2 of your peers by answering the following questions: Was this person plagiarising? Why or why not? What could/should this person have done differently to change the situation to ensure that they were being academically honest? Why?


Students will be asked to complete the “how useful was this lesson” survey

Previously, there were a  group of optional extensions for the lesson. I have chosen to include them in the unit as a way to expand understanding


Evaluate


Evaluate

Analyze


Evaluate

Analyze

Synthesize

Evaluate

I have added three mini guides on Copyright Law, Fair Use and Creative Commons Guidelines

Synthesize

















Analyze

Supplemental Materials –

Academic Integrity Survey

Plagiarism Pre-Test

Plagiarism Video Lecture

Plagiarism Post-Test

Supplemental Materials –

Academic Integrity Survey

Plagiarism Pre-Test

Plagiarism Video Lecture

Plagiarism Video Transcript

The Plagiarist

NYTimes Articles

Plagiarist discussion

Plagiarism in the “real world” discussion

“What is Copyright” Guidelines

“What is Fair Use” Guidelines

“What is Creative Commons” Guidelines

Plagiarism scenarios discussion


Evaluation of the Students –

Formal – Pre-Test and Post Test

Informal – Check for understanding

Are students responding to questions?

Are students engaged with the lecture?

Are students following along?

Informal – circulate to ensure students are on task

Evaluation of the Students –

Formal – Pre-Test, Discussions, Essay

Informal – Check for understanding

Are students responding to questions?

Are students creating appropriate scenarios?

Are students suggesting appropriate actions in the discussion?


Evaluation of the Lesson –

Are students engaged? Are they participating? Are they writing notes? Are they using computers and devices appropriately for task? Circulate providing individualized help as necessary.

Formal – How helpful was this lesson survey

Evaluation of the Lesson –

Informal - Are students engaged? Are they participating? Is there confusion? Do a lot of students ask for clarification?

Formal – How helpful was this lesson survey

Based on our discussions about feedback and it’s role in informing instruction, I have made some changes in what I will look for informally to help me with the lesson




Previously Optional Additional Activities

Plagiarism Discussion

The following are three articles that have appeared in The New York Times recently that deal with plagiarism. Please read all three articles. Then write a paragraph that discusses plagiarism using ideas from all three articles. Once you have posted, please return and respond to at least 2 of your classmate's posts. (Can use Classroom or Library Discussion Forum for activity)


Gabriel, Trip. "Lines on Plagiarism Blur for Students in the Digital Age." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. The New York Times Company, 1 Aug 2010. Web. 12 Jan. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/02/education/02cheat.html>.


Staples, Brent. "Editorial Observer - Cutting and Pasting - A Senior Thesis by (Insert Name)." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. The New York Times Company, 12 July 2010. Web. 12 Jan. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/opinion/13tue4.html>.


Itzkoff, Dave. "'South Park' Creators Apologize for Lifting Dialogue." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. The New York Times Company, 22 Oct. 2010. Web. 12 Jan. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/23/business/media/23southpark.html>.


Reading Assignment - The Seance - "The Plagiarist"

Read "The Plagiarist" - by Isaac Bashevis Singer. It is available as a Google e-book below. It begins on page 95 and goes to page 110.


Singer, Isaac Bashevis. "The Seance and Other Stories - Google Books." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 July. 2012. < http://books.google.com/books?id=WjTgvykUFNcC&pg=PA95&lpg=PA95&dq=%22The+Plagiarist%22+-+by+Isaac+Bashevis+Singer&source=bl&ots=kkWdmaYBri&sig=Ue_jeCNg30YM4wLrDq5w3xknJp0&hl=en&ei=4W1RTdnKDYT58Abo5c2vCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBMQ6AEw>.


"The Plagiarist" Discussion

As you can see in this short story, plagiarism affects many people. Who does the plagiarism effect in this story? How?

Obviously, the chances of a life threatening illness being brought upon you by plagiarizing is unlikely, however, there are effects for many when plagiarism occurs. Who does plagiarism affect in real life? How? Even if you never plagiarize, how might somebody else plagiarizing in your class affect you, even if they are not caught?

After you have posted, please return to read and respond to the answers of at least 2 of your peers.

(Can use Classroom or Library Discussion Forum for activity)


"The Plagiarist" Essay Prompt

Write an alternate ending to this story. It may be anything, so long as it does not involve the plagiarist dying or the Rabi going into seclusion. Be sure to indicate where in the story your ending fits by including the paragraph that will immediately proceed yours in quotations marks with proper MLA citation. Instead of a thesis statement, you should include a "moral" to this story. A final lesson for readers to take away when they are done reading it.

Prompt altered from:

Koy, Christopher E.. "Using Fiction by Issac Bashevis Singer to Prevent Plagiarism." Academia.edu. Challenges of English Language Teaching II, n.d. Web. 14 Feb. 2011. <jcu.academia.edu/ChristopherKoy/Papers/107944/Using_Fiction_by_Isaac_Bashevis_Singer_to_Prevent_Plagiarism>.

New Common Core Standards Aligned to

CC.ELA.RI.10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

a. Develop factual, interpretive, and evaluative questions for further exploration of the topic(s)

CC.ELA.RI.10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

CC.ELA.RI.10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

CC.ELA.RI.10.10 By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11-12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

CC.ELA.W.10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

CC.ELA.W.10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CC.ELA.W.10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

CC.ELA.W.10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

CC.ELA.W.10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

CC.ELA.W.10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

CC.ELA.W.10.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

CC.ELA.W.10.11 Create literary texts that demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of texts of recognized literary merit.

a. Engage in a wide range of prewriting experiences, such as using a variety of visual representations, to express personal, social, and cultural connections and insights.  

b. Identify, analyze, and use elements and techniques of various genres of literature.

d. Create poetry, stories, plays, and other literary forms (e.g. videos, art work).    

CC.ELA.SL.10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning

presented.

e. Seek to understand other perspectives and cultures and communicate effectively with audiences or individuals from varied backgrounds.

CC.ELA.SL.10.2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.  

CC.ELA.SL.10.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

CC.ELA.SL.10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CC.ELA.L.10.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a. Use parallel structure.*

b. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional,

absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations

CC.ELA.L.10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.

b. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.

c. Spell correctly.

CC.ELA.L.10.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

a. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian’s Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.

CC.ELA.L.10.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).

c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

CC.ELA.L.10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.

b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

CC.ELA.L.10.6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.